Taken Away – Available NOW

  Jessee Bradford, a respected young veterinarian in Santa Barbara, California, comes home to find his wife Serena and baby daughter Sofia missing. Jessee fears they have been kidnapped or worse. The FBI investigators believe his wife, the only daughter of a wealthy philanthropist who never approved of their marriage, simply abandoned Jessee and took their child with no intention of returning. After months of fruitless searching, Jessee relocates to his grandparents’ home in Iowa, where he takes over his grandpa’s veterinary practice. There he finds the family closeness he’s been missing and falls in love with a female equestrian Laura. When Jessee and Laura attend a gallery opening of an artist named She, the paintings remind Jessee of his wife Serena’s art work. Thus begins Jessee’s search to find She while his future with Laura teeters precariously on the edge until the truth about She is discovered. My second

Continue reading

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

11 Signs You Were Born And Raised In California

BY JARRET LEONG APRIL 10, 2014 Photo: Linda Tanner 1. You’ve never called it “Cali.” The only people who call it “Cali” aren’t from California. It’s not that anyone has to tell you not to say it, people just don’t. I think it’s a respect thing. It feels almost like calling your mother by her first name. I’m cringing just thinking about it. 2. Burritos are a constant topic of conversation while abroad. My Japanese friend was convinced that “you know Californians miss home when they start talking about burritos.” True enough, in-depth discussions about missing our burrito joints of choice would come up even more often than being apart from our families. Burritos are a unifying part of the Californian experience — black, Asian, gay, poor, rich, or Ke$ha, you love a dank-ass burrito. 3. Other English speakers don’t understand your English. Speaking of dank-ass food, we don’t speak the same

Continue reading

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

The Daring Racism Experiment That People Still Talk About 20 Years Later

  FROM THE HUFFINGTON POST 1/5/2015 More than 20 years ago, “The Oprah Winfrey Show” conducted an experiment about racial prejudice that audiences will never forget. The year was 1992 — in the wake of the deadly Los Angeles riots that erupted after the acquittal of police officers on trial for the beating of Rodney King — and racial tensions in the country were running high. Yet, the “Oprah Show” audience members didn’t suspect a thing when they arrived at the studio and were immediately separated into two distinct groups. The division wasn’t based on skin color, but eye color. “What we did was treat each group differently, discriminating against the people who have blue eyes, catering to those people with brown eyes,” Oprah explained back then. As the audience lined up to enter the studio, the blue-eyed people were pulled out of line, told to put on a green collar and

Continue reading

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

25 Life Lessons We All Can Use, From A Very Wise 99-Year-Old Great-Grandpa

  By: Yagana Shah Become a fan yagana.shah@huffingtonpost.com  When you need advice, you ask someone who knows best. When you need life advice, you go to someone who’s seen it all. And who could be better than a great-grandfather with 99 years of life experience under his belt? Recently, PopSugar’s Macy Williams, wrote about her nonagenarian great-grandfather, known in the family as “Grandpa Cheese,” and his life lessons we can all apply. Williams calls him an “inspirational man.” “He has experienced so much in life — love, loss, triumph, and failure. And through all of that he has continued to remain himself and keep people laughing while he’s at it,” Williams told Huff/Post50 in an email. Grandpa, whose real name is Andy Anderson, is chock full of advice. After all, he’s had quite the incredible life. He never went to college, but ended up being the national dairy manager for grocery store chain Safeway. He

Continue reading

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

Special Delivery: Rare Set Of Elephant Twins Born In South Africa by Stephen Messenger

Facebook/Pongola Game Reserve  By Stephen Messenger  December 08, 2014 Every new elephant birth is a cause for celebration given the state of the species — elephants are killed in record numbers due to rampant ivory poaching. But one pachyderm parent on the Pongola Game Reserve in South Africa is doing more than her part to help replenish the species’ numbers by giving birth to a rare set of twins. Reserve spokesman Donoven Gloy told The Dodo by phone that the two new arrivals, first reported last week, appear to be healthy in the company of their mother, a 33-year-old named Curve. “The reaction here has been great,” says Gloy. “Everyone is feeling very positive and they’re receiving quite a bit of attention here in South Africa.”   (Facebook/Pongola Game Reserve) The prevalence of twins among elephants is said to be exceedingly rare, with studies suggesting it occurs 0.5 percent of the time. Dr. Ian Whyte, an elephant

Continue reading

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

11 Reasons Why I Read & Why Books Should Not Disappear by Tammy T. Stone

Via Tammy T. Stoneon Dec 6, 2014 – from THE ELEPHANT JOURNAL “You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.” ~ C. S. Lewis Lately, my newsfeed has been brimming with articles about how scientific research has proven that reading is good for you, how readers are smarter/better/sexier, on why readers of fiction are more empathetic people—things like this. My first reaction was, um, isn’t this all stating the obvious? But I keep forgetting that while I grew up without computers (or even video games, despite an attempt at interest in Donkey Kong and Super Mario Bros.), let alone the Internet, younger generations are quite literally inhabiting a different world. I wasn’t huddled under the covers texting after bedtime. I was whipping out my flashlight to read the Choose Your Own Adventure books, Flowers in the Attic and Emily of New Moon under the covers (depending on the week,

Continue reading

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

7 THINGS HAPPY PEOPLE DO DIFFERENTLY BY TAMARA STAR

What I know about happiness is this: happy people do things differently. There are billions of people on our planet and clearly, some are truly happy. The rest of us bounce back and forth between happiness and well, unhappiness depending on the day. According to Psychology Today, University of California researcher Sonja Lyubomirsky states: “40% of our of our capacity for happiness is within our power to change.“ Throughout the years I’ve learned there are certain traits and habits happy people seem to have mastered. But before diving in with you, let me preface this and say: We all have bad days, even weeks—myself included—when we fall down in all seven areas. None of us are perfect and messing up once in a while doesn’t mean we’re destined for a gloomy life.   The difference between a happy and unhappy life is how often and how long we stay there. Here are the

Continue reading

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

7 ANIMALS WHO ARE NOT WELL-KNOWN BUT THEY’RE REAL….AND THEY’RE FABULOUS

STRAIGHT FROM THE DODO: By Aaron Rodriques   1. Desert rain frog   (calphotos.berkley.edu/Arie van der Meijden) This adorable species of frog is native to South Africa and Namibia. As a mating call, the frog can emit a very high-pitched whistle, making it look and sound like some kind of squeak toy. They are currently considered vulnerable, with their population experiencing a decline due to extensive mining. 2. Prehensile-tailed porcupine   (Flickr/Eric Kilby) Like the desert rain frog, the prehensile-tailed porcupine has a uniquely adorable squeak (this guy sounds like a bicycle horn). Found throughout South America, these amazing critters have muscular, prehensile tails that allow them to move through trees. 3. Solenodon   (Mongabay.com/Jeremy Hance) Contrary to his appearance, the solenodon is not a rat or a shrew who’s had his nose pinched too hard; they belong to their own genus, and were discovered way back in 1833. The solenodon can survive on a number of different

Continue reading

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

Subscribe to Patricia’s Newsletter

Subscribe to Patricia’s newsletter and get weekly updates on what’s happening on her blog and special news about new releases.

BookViral