SIX UNEXPECTED WAYS BEES BENEFIT EVERYONE

14 July 2014

The Natural Resources Defense Council has recently created a donation fund to prevent major chemical companies Dow, Bayer, Monsanto and Syngenta from using toxic pesticides which endanger the lives of bees. Because this is an important step in saving the already dwindling bee populations, we’ve decided to compile these great reasons to save our bees, which you may not have been aware of:

1. Toxins found in bee venom may help to destroy HIV. Their venom contains a substance called “melittin”, which is capable of piercing small holes the protective envelope surrounding the HIV virus.

Giphy

2. Bees are capable of “reverse-aging” in their brains. This means that whenever they take on a responsibility which is typically performed by a much younger bee, their brain changes accordingly. This behavior may help in giving researchers the ability to slow or treat age-related dementia.

3. The resin made by bees to seal their hives, called propolis, has numerous health benefits, including soothing inflammation and pain, fighting infection, and acting as an antioxidant for the bloodstream.

4. Bees can recognize faces through the process of piecing together the facial features (known as configural processing), much in the same way as humans. The study of bee facial-recognition methods could potentially be beneficial to the wider facial-recognition community, even being used to improve airport security.

5. Bees are capable of solving some complex mathematical problems, as they can identify the shortest distance between two points (or in this case, flowers) even if they didn’t find the two points in the same order. They are apparently the first animals to do this. By understanding how bees calculate the shortest distance without using a computer, humans could simplify how they operate daily networks such as traffic routes and information flow on the internet.

Giphy

6. Researchers believe that the methods bees use in hunting for food could inform authorities on the behavioral patterns of serial killers. Reason being, bees use geographic profiling — meaning they hunt far enough away from their nest so as to not alert predators or other parasites to the location of their home. Scientists believe serial killers operate in a similar fashion, creating a “buffer zone” around their home base.

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

THE TEARS OF AN ELEPHANT

from THE DISH/BIASED AND UNBALANCED

July 7, 2014

 

Yesterday, there was a strikingly good reported piece in the NYT magazine on thegrowing evidence that consciousness does not have some kind of radical break between humans and every other species on the planet. And by consciousness, at varying levels, I mean, for example, the ability to feel fear, or joy, or anxiety, or even grief. This is emphatically not about anthropomorphism. It’s about the reality of creation:

A profusion of recent studies has shown animals to be far closer to us than we previously believed — it turns out that common shore crabs feel and remember pain, zebra finches experience REM sleep, fruit-fly brothers cooperate, dolphins and elephants recognize themselves in mirrors, chimpanzees assist one another without expecting favors in return and dogs really do feel elation in their owners’ presence. In the summer of 2012, an unprecedented document, masterminded by Low — “The Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness in Human and Nonhuman Animals”[PDF] — was signed by a group of leading animal researchers in the presence of Stephen Hawking. It asserted that mammals, birds and other creatures like octopuses possess consciousness and, in all likelihood, emotions and self-awareness.

And then I come across this rather beautiful story about an elephant around my own age, captured in his infancy, chained and shackled his entire life, until he is released by an animal welfare group:

Fitted with painful shackles for nearly his entire life, Raju had been forced to walk the dusty roads of India, interacting with tourists in exchange for coins and food. His body bears the signs of malnutrition and the scars of physical abuse — but the emotional toll was no less profound. Late last week, a team led by the UK-based animal charity, Wildlife SOS, intervened to liberate Raju from his cruel keeper. As it started to become clear that they were there to help him, the elephant wept.

Wept? I was doubtful until I read other tales of exactly this phenomenon: in a book from Jeffrey Masson, When Elephants Weep, and a recent story about a newborn elephant calf, rejected by its mother, who then cried uncontrollably for five hours.

Does weeping mean in elephants what it does in humans? We cannot know, of course. But when it is occasioned by the kind of event that prompts human tears, it does not seem to me to be indulging in anthropomorphism to posit that something like grief or relief (or some elephantine version of either) is behind it. And that, to my mind, tells us a huge amount empirically about the way we treat animals in our society: we treat countless living creatures as if they had no feelings and as if we shared nothing in our experiences. That’s not just based on untruth; it is the kind of thing that future generations may well look back on in horror and disbelief.

To see what is in front of one’s nose …

(Photo: Tears run down the face of Motala the elephant. She is crying from the pain as vets clean up the damaged tissue that is all that is left of her front left foot. She is a patient at the Elephant Hospital where vets and doctors hope she will recover from extensive damage when she stepped on a landmine on the Thai/Burma border. The hospital was founded by Khun Soraida Salwala, and the NGO Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE). By Peter Charlesworth/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

7 Reasons Why People Age Better In California

 

The Huffington Post  | By 

Contrary to popular wisdom, not everything keeps better in the cold. Some things, like people, actually may age better if they live in the warmer temps of southern California. Don’t think so, eh? Post why in the comments below. But for Huff/Post 50, we think Californians age better because:

Californians, in general, are happier.
We all know that exposure to sunlight combats depression and lifts our spirits. And let’s face it, Californians are outside in the sun more. In southern California, pretty much every day is a sunny day, especially thanks to our current drought conditions. Sure there is hellacious traffic, but once we find our zen with the 405 Freeway, the rest is easy. We aren’t going to win any centenarians’ race here (although the 2010 Census said we had 5,921 people who were 100 or older,compared to New York with a mere 4,605), but we’d venture to say that more of our “elder olders” get to the finish line with a smile on their tanned faces.

Californians don’t get skin cancers as much as Vermonters.
We all know that sun damages our skin, which is why it’s so surprising that the incidence of skin cancer is actually higher in some cold weather states than it is in California. The incidence of skin cancers is lower in California, says the Centers for Disease Control, than in many other states including Connecticut, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

Could it be that Californians are just more vigilant about applying sunscreen?People who use sunscreen daily show 24 percent less skin aging than those who don’t. It may also be that we are just more vigilant about going to see our dermatologists. The $10.1 billion dermatology market in the U.S. is expected to grow to $13.1 million by 2017. Why? Because of the population’s aging.

Californians exercise, like a lot.
Exercise keeps our hearts stronger, our blood pressure lower and our bones and muscles stronger. The California lifestyle is just more conducive to exercising. It has us out at the beach, on bicycles, boards — boogie, snow and surf — and of course skis (sometimes all on the same day). We were born with tennis rackets in our hands. We love our mountain hiking trails. We get dogs as fashion accessories and then have to walk them.

And yes, we actually walk places, despite the perception that we drive everywhere.According to MiceChat, just spending the day at Disneyland will put about 6 miles on your Fitbit.

We accept when our number is up — at least when it comes to defibrillators, unlike the good people of Oregon.
The California State Supreme court recently rejected the claims of the family of a California woman who died of cardiac arrest while shopping in Target. As the story goes, Mary Ann Verdugo, 49, collapsed while shopping at a Pico Rivera Target store in August of 2008. Paramedics were called, but couldn’t revive her. The Verdugo family sued, claiming Target should have had a defibrillator available in its store in case of medical emergency. Not so, said the state court. The court concluded there is nothing in California law requiring any of our retailers to provide a defibrillator. The only state to have such a requirement on the books is Oregon, which has a statute requiring the owner of a “place of public assembly” to have at least one defibrillator in place. This from the state that brought us Jack Kevorkian. Go figure.

Californians are forced to wear bathing suits year round.
Unlike the Northeast, Californians don’t get a grace period for pigging out around the winter holidays. Knowing that we can get invited to a pool or beach party on a day’s notice — 365 days a year — keeps us on our toes in the over-eating and under-exercising departments. Don’t believe us? Mappers have counted 43,123 swimming pools in Los Angeles alone. And that doesn’t count the San Fernando Valley, which would kind of be like eliminating Long Island in a New York count.

Californians have Hollywood role models.
While a few have gone a little crazy in the plastic surgery department, many celebrities have shown us how to age gracefully. And if George Clooney at 53 isn’t the handsomest guy out there, well, we don’t know who is.

Californians invented reinvention.
Second acts, second chapters, call it whatever you want. But when it comes to figuring out what your next incarnation is, we are all Shirley MacLaines. If the first career fizzles out, Californians just go find themselves a new one where their charms are more appreciated. Actors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Ronald Reagan both enjoyed long second acts in politics.

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
Permalink

 

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/jamila_lyiscott_3_ways_to_speak_english?utm_source=newsletter_daily&utm_campaign=daily&utm_medium=email&utm_content=button__2014-06-19

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

Nat Geo Wild - An Understatement

This is an incredibly gorgeous, short video to start your day.

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

GLAD TO HAVE YOU BACK

Posted in THE DODO on June 3, 2014

These rare animals were lost to extinction … until they were found, again. Here are seven tenacious critters that held on for dear life in some of the most remote crannies of the world, so invisible we thought they were gone for good:

1. After 120 years, the New Guinea big-eared bat rises again

[Catherine Hughes]

About two years ago, scientists working in the forests of Papa New Guinea spotted a small, strange bat, which didn’t match any current records of “microbats” that lived in the area. In May, a bat expert confirmed that the animal was, in fact, a type of bitty bat last seen in 1890. Although the bat is quite rare, there’s a silver lining: the confirmation means the mammal is no longer “possibly extinct,” as listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

2. The Cuban solenodon is still sniffing around after a long absence

[It's Nature]

The Cuban solenodon, a shrew-like mammal with venomous saliva, has been performing its Houdini act for centuries. It’s been spotted only 37 times since discovered in Cuba in 1861 — and in 1970, it was believed to be extinct. But zoologists successfully captured and released a solenodon named “Alejandrito” in 2003. “All we can hope is that there are more and that they could have babies,” Douglas Long, a biologist at the California Academy of Sciences, told the AP.

3. Missing for 65 million years, the coelacanth lives on under the sea

[Mark V. Erdmann]

The first contact humans had with coelacanths were fossils — some of which were 65 million years old (that’s back around the time when dinosaurs went extinct). But even 200-pound, 6-foot-long fishes have plenty of space to hide in the ocean. It wasn’t until 1938 when a South African museum curator caught a coelacanth, which looked remarkably unchanged given its Cretaceous ancestry.

4. The Clarion nightsnake hid on a remote island for 80 years

[Daniel Mulcahy]

The Clarion nightsnake is so rare, biologists had erased it from the scientific record — until the snake was rediscovered earlier this year. The serpent wasn’t so easy to find, either. Biologists traveled to a remote island off the coast of Mexico — along with a military escort — to search for the nightsnake.

5. The Lord Howe stick insects survived under a single bush

[Zoos Victoria]

The Lord Howe stick insects grow so large, they were once known as “tree lobsters.” But a giant size couldn’t save the tropical bugs from hungry rats, which humans introduced to the insect’s home island in the early 1900s. Thought extinct for almost 50 years, a handful of hardy survivors remained living under a single bush, clinging to life on a 225-foot-tall rocky outcropping that juts out of the sea.

6. It took half a century to find the ivory-billed woodpecker

[Arthur Allen & Jerry Payne]

Billed as the “holy grail” (or, if you prefer, the Elvis) of bird-watching, this rare woodpecker had eluded birders in the southern U.S. for about 50 years. One of the largest woodpeckers in the world, a kayaker spotted the ivory-bill in 2004. “Through the 20th century it’s been every birder’s fantasy to catch a glimpse of this bird, however remote the possibility,” John Fitzpatrick, an ornithologist at Cornell University, told National Geographic.

7. 80 years later, biologists get a glimpse of one of the tiniest primates around

[Perrenque]

The teeny, 2-ounce pygmy tarsier (which looks like a cross between a Furby and a friendly gremlin) hadn’t been seen since the 1920s. But in 2008, the little primate was rediscovered in Indonesia, thanks to the work of scientists at Texas A&M University. As Sharon Gusky-Doyen, a Texas A&M professor, told National Geographic: “There have been dozens of expeditions looking for them — all unsuccessful. I needed to go and try to see for myself if they were really there or if they were really extinct.”

 

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

The Oldest Living American

by Kate Abbey-Lambertz, the Huffington Post

Happy Birthday, Mother Talley!

Jeralean Talley is America’s oldest living woman on record. And as she turns 115, we’d all do well to follow her example.

“Mother Talley,” as she’s sometimes called, celebrates her birthday Friday. Born in 1899, the supercentenarian has seen three centuries, and still seems to be going strong. According to the Associated Press, she’s visiting the doctor Friday, but still feels healthy.

The Gerontology Research Group keeps a record of the validated longest-living people in the world. According to the GRG, Misao Okawa, who is 116 and lives in Japan, is the oldest living person. Talley is a close second.

Talley lives in Inkster, Mich. but was born Jeralean Kurtz in Montrose, Ga. She lived on a farm where she picked cotton and peanuts, according to Time. She moved to Michigan in 1935 and married her husband, Alfred Talley, in 1936. The two were together 52 years before he died.

It’s not surprising that Talley gained some wisdom over her 115 years. Here are some of her simple, but timeless, words to live by.

Follow the Golden Rule.

Talley has repeatedly given the advice that you should treat others how you want to be treated. “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you, that’s my way of living,” she told WJBK-TV last year.

Always have a sense of humor.

Talley apparently tried to drive just one time, and failed miserably, as she tells the Detroit Free Press. But telling the story of that failed attempt, complete with a few expletives, cracks her up — and us, too.

Keep active.

Talley went bowling until she was 104, and still has an annual fishing trip.

But don’t be afraid to occasionally indulge.

Talley is known for making headcheese, a jellied loaf made of various pig parts, and has a sweet tooth, according to Time.

Have strong beliefs.

Talley’s faith is a large part of her life, and she’ll be celebrating her birthday at her local church this weekend. When asked why she lives so long, she told the Free Press, “It’s all in the good Lord’s hands.”

Surround yourself with loved ones.

Talley was married for half a century. Now, she lives with her daughter and has great-great-grandchildren. One of her favorite activities is playing with her young great-great-grandson, according to the Free Press.

Be humble, and act wisely.

“I don’t have much education, but what little sense I got, I try to use it,” Talley told WJBK. There’s a powerful message in her modesty.

 

 

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL WITH THE GO PRO 3+

In rhe words of the filmmaker Cristian Dimitirus, ‘May it inspire you to help save them’.

http://youtu.be/pFL1sQegsKk

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

THE PERFECT MOTHER'S DAY GIFT

MOTHER’S DAY IS COMING UP ON MAY 11TH.

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW IF YOU’VE EVER HAD A MOTHER YOU LOVE:

 

24 Applicants Were Terrified To Do This Job. Then They Found Out Why Billions Already Do It.

Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

FLORIDA TURTLES SEE THE FIRST LIGHT OF DAY

This is amazing. Florida turtles see the first light of day. How lucky these men were to be in the right spot at the right time.
Click on this link below:
Share this:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

Subscribe To Posts



Write A Review

Write reviews of books at Ask David