7 SECRETS OF WISE PEOPLE - AND HOW TO BECOME ONE NOW

Straight from the Huffiington Post by CATHERINE PEARSON

Quick — who are the wisest people you know? Chances are they have at least a few things in common: They’re experienced, kind and of a certain age. Wisdom, the thinking generally goes, is hard-earned by putting in your time and piecing together scraps of knowledge along the way.

But maybe a younger person also sprang to mind — someone who, despite his or her relative youth, you regard as genuinely wise. That’s because wisdom — which University of Florida, Gainesville sociology professor Monika Ardelt, defines as a combination of cognitive, reflective and compassionate qualities — is not the sole purview of the elderly. Wisdom, explains Ardelt (who studies the topic), is something that can be cultivated, and the potential pay-offs are big: Her research has shown that wise men and women enjoy improved well-being as they age, because they’re better able to deal with challenges, such as declining health and the loss of loved ones.

So what are the secrets of those people who are wise beyond their years? Ardelt shares a few traits that wise people tend to have in common, as well as several pathways for getting there … soon.

1. Wise people have a lot of experiences … 
travel
The reason it’s often said that wisdom comes with age is, in fact, because older people tend to have had more life experiences than their younger counterparts. And experience, Ardelt says, is one of the true cornerstones of wisdom.

2. … And they’re sponges.
“It’s not just experiences alone that make you wise, it is learning from them,” Ardelt says — and not everyone does that. That’s why she pushes back against the idea that travel necessarily cultivates wisdom. Sure, some people leave their comfort zone and see the world through a different lens, which opens them up in new and valuable ways, but others travel the world and don’t learn at all. If anything, Ardelt said, traveling just reinforces their negative stereotypes. The key is soaking up lessons wherever you are, whether it’s the town where you’ve lived your entire life, or some far-flung location.

3. Wise people see what’s right in front of them.
After the publication of a recent New York Times article on the connection between age and wisdom (which referenced Ardelt’s research) a reader wrote her summing up wisdom as, basically, understanding the obvious. “Wise people know something,” Ardelt says. “But the interesting thing is not that they know more, about, say, the origin of the universe … wise people actually know the deeper meaning of things that are generally known, actually.”

We all know we’re going to die, for example. Wise people have a better understanding of the meaning of that, and live differently — placing an emphasis on relationships, spirituality and personal growth rather than on more superficial markers of success.

4. They meditate.
meditation
In order to achieve that kind of direct, I-see-who-I-am, who-you-are, and-the-circumstances-right-in-front-of-us kind of knowledge, reflection is paramount, Ardelt says. Which is why meditation — a kind of self-examination — has long been believed to be a pathway to wisdom. “It’s kind of a time out of everyday life by just observing the breath, or observing sensations,” she says. “Naturally, things come up and the trick is just to accept it, whatever it is, and not to react with negativity.”

5. Wise people grow from crises.
Often the people who are considered wise beyond their years have survived a trauma, or several, and have effectively coped with it, according to Ardelt. Indeed, there’s an entire area of psychology dedicated to post-traumatic growth — exploring the ways in which people who have survived something devastating emerge changed for the better.

But wisdom can also come from managing smaller problems, she says — such as a really bad day at work, or someone cutting you off in traffic: “These are little crises, and you can say, ‘How do I react to this?’ Do you get all riled up, or do you look at it from another perspective?” Your boss may have had a bad day, or that the man in traffic may have been under enormous pressure to get home for reasons you can’t fully know.

6. They have a strong support network.
One of the conditions that tends to separate people who are able to grow and learn from a difficult situation from those who are not is the presence of a strong support system, Ardelt explains. It may be a formal support group, therapy, friends or family. “People who feel that they are alone … if there is nothing, it can be very difficult to learn anything [from the trauma] because it’s just so devastating,” she says.

7. They’re tolerant.
holding hands
Compassion is a key component of wisdom, Ardelt says. She cites the example of very skilled politicians or sales people who may have a keen understanding of themselves, or great insights into how the world works, but if they use that knowledge for self-centered means, they lack true wisdom.

That’s why reflection is so important — it helps you see yourself as you truly are, limitations and all, so you can then empathize with others, and act accordingly.

 

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TANZANIAN STORYTELLER AND MUSICIAN

Published on Feb 5, 2014:
PCI Media Impact has teamed up with Tanzanian storyteller and musician Mrisho Mpoto to produce “Deni La Hisani”; a public call to action, to end poaching in Tanzania.
Mrisho Mpoto’s talents span poetry, directing, acting and singing. This is his call to protect our animal kingdom cousins.

Wonderful video from Tanzania. In the end, the endemic peoples of Africa will be the keepers of her wild heritage…. this is a powerful video by those precious people.

http://youtu.be/d6Cf3Rmqg1s

 

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An Elephant Prepped For Surgery

  • NO BLOOD OR GUTS, SO THOSE OF YOU WHO GET QUEASY, YOU DON’T NEED TO WORRY.
    Have you ever seen an elephant undergo surgery?  I never imagined such an ordeal, until I came upon this SHORT video on Facebook.
    It shows what they have to go through to get an elephant bull “prepped” for surgery. Extraordinary to say the least!
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7 Amazing Facts About Elephants That Make Poaching Even Worse

7 Amazing Facts About Elephants That Make Poaching Even Worse

Although we know more about them and ecological importance than ever before, humans have only become more cruel to elephants. Last year was one of the toughest on record for these gentle giants. “Conservationists warned that Africa could lose one-fifth of its elephants unless something is done to halt poachers and that elephants could disappear in the wild in Africa by 2025,” wrote Care2′s Kristina Chew.

Very few of us ever get the chance see an elephant up close and personal, in its own habitat. This lack of experience makes it difficult to grasp the gravity of the situation, and how much we stand to lose if elephants are driven into extinction. So here are seven amazing things you might not have known about this fascinating animal–seven facts that make hunting them for their teeth, or keeping them captive, even more absurd.

7 Amazing Facts About Elephants That Make Poaching Even Worse

1. The elephant is the largest land animal on the planet. The African species stands between 8 and 13 feet tall and weighs 5,000 to 14,000 pounds. The Asian elephant stands about 6.6 to 9.8 feet tall and weighs 4,960 to 12,125 pounds. The largest elephant on record weighed about 24,000 pounds and stood 13 feet tall. Even baby elephants are quite imposing, entering the world at 3 feet tall and about 200 pounds.

2. Elephants hire babysitters. After carrying their unborn young for around 22 months, it’s no wonder that mother elephants sometimes need a break. Elephant culture embodies the “it takes a village” mindset, with mothers appointing several babysitters to care for her baby so that she has time to eat enough to produce sufficient milk for it.

3. Elephants use their trunks as a snorkel (not a straw!). Many people believe the myth that elephants drink water through their nose. While it’s true that elephants can draw up to two gallons of water into their seven foot-long nose, they only hold it there before shooting it into their mouth. They can also use their trunks as snorkels when they wade in deep water.

4. Elephants use their ears for air conditioning. Filled with hundreds of tiny, intersecting veins, elephant ears act like an onboard cooling system. “As they flap their wet ears the blood in these veins is cooled, and the cooled blood is circulated around the elephant’s body,” explains Live Science. And yes, those massive ears to allow the elephant to hear exceptionally well, but African elephants can also ” hear” with their feet thanks to sensory cells that detect vibrations.

5. Elephants speak more languages than you. Turns out elephants have been using their massive brains to listen in on human conversation, which helps them avoid danger. “[N]ew research has demonstrated they’re even more sophisticated than we thought and have learned to differentiate between different languages, ages and genders among humans and determine who poses a threat to them,” writes Alicia Graef for Care2.

6. Elephants care for their sick. Worrying about a loved one who is sick or injured isn’t limited to humankind. Elephants are extremely social creatures. If an elephant becomes sick, herd members will bring it food and help it stand up if it’s weak. Elephants will also “hug” by wrapping their trunks together in displays of greeting and affection.

7. Elephants have funerals. Learning how much elephants love and care for each other makes this no surprise. When a member of the herd can’t be nursed back to health, elephants engage in death rituals and mourning. They are one of the only known mammals besides humans to do this.

Sources: SoftpediaLiveScienceThe IndependentHuffington Post

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/7-amazing-facts-about-elephants-that-make-poaching-even-worse.html#ixzz2wFyVKM78

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7-Million-Year-Old Clues to Elephant Social Complexity by Barbara J. King

A family of elephants in Kenya's Maasai Mara game reserve.

A family of elephants in Kenya’s Maasai Mara game reserve.

Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images

For 14 months of my life I was lucky enough to reside in Amboseli National Park, Kenya. Funded by the National Science Foundation to study baboons, I lived surrounded by a gorgeous array of mammals and birds. I was fascinated, in particular, by the elephants who roamed the savannas and swamps.

As I witnessed at Amboseli, the core social units in elephant herds are made up of female relatives and their offspring. In these matriarchal units, bonds are tight. When family members spend time apart, their reunion is often a joyful event, marked by entwined trunks and trumpeted vocalizations. Males remain part of these units only until puberty. After that, they live mostly on their own, joining another herd for mating.

Last month, scientists reported an exciting discovery: A series of fossilized footprints suggests that elephants lived in these same family units, with the big bulls roaming alone, 7 million years ago.

Paleontologist Faysal Bibi and his research teampublished their findings in the journal Biology Letters.At a desert site called Mleisa 1 in the United Arab Emirates, two preserved “trackways” of prehistoric elephant prints were found. In speaking with the BBC,Bibi called the footprints “a beautiful snapshot” of the animal’s social behavior.

The first trackway shows that at least 13 individuals moved simultaneously in a single direction. The variation in footprint sizes and stride lengths guarantees that elephants of different ages and, almost certainly, of both sexes moved together.

The second trackway cleanly intersects the first at a single point. These prints were made by a large elephant, very probably a sexually mature male. All indications are that this male was solitary and moved over the landscape apart from the herd. Bibi et al. conclude that “The Meisa 1 trackways provide direct evidence for the antiquity of characteristic and complex social structure in Proboscidea,” the taxonomic family that includes living and extinct elephants, as well as mastodons and mammoths.

I’m forever telling my anthropology students that “behavior doesn’t fossilize.” In a sense, the elephant trackways make an exception to that rule. Strictly speaking, it’s the herd structure that is reconstructed by the footprints. But might this not clue us in to herdbehavior as well? It’s reasonable to suspect that prehistoric elephant families whose members traveled together also shared emotional bonds.

Seven million years ago, there were no Homo sapiens on our planet; our lineage was either in its extreme infancy or soon to evolve. I love to imagine the trackway elephants roaming a world without us.

Nowadays, researchers report that elephants experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) because of human actions. In The New York Times Magazine in 2006, Charles Siebert wrote:

“In ‘Elephant Breakdown,’ a 2005 essay in the journalNature, [psychologist Gay] Bradshaw and several colleagues argued that today’s elephant populations are suffering from a form of chronic stress, a kind of species-wide trauma. Decades of poaching and culling and habitat loss, they claim, have so disrupted the intricate web of familial and societal relations by which young elephants have traditionally been raised in the wild, and by which established elephant herds are governed, that what we are now witnessing is nothing less than a precipitous collapse of elephant culture.”

Siebert notes, and I agree, that the evidence for elephant PTSD is compelling. It’s only gotten worse for elephants in the years since he wrote his piece, as the current situation in Cameroon exemplifies. Elephant slaughter is terrible enough; on top of that, the survivors suffer emotionally.

Thanks to the discovery of the elephant trackways, we know that elephants have lived in complex social units for at least 7 million years. For all the millenia intervening between then and today, elephants have survived and adapted. I hope that they can survive what we’re doing to them now.


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THE GROWN WOMAN'S OATH

Straight from the Huffington Post written by Dr. F. Emelia Sam, a soul-centered scribe at heart and an oral and maxillofacial surgeon on the side.

 

 

The Grown Woman's Oath

t f

WOMEN

The Grown Woman’s Oath

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How Wolves Change Rivers - For The Better

 

When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park after being gone for 70 years an amazing thing happened. This short video shows how the Earth changed back to how it was before the wolves were exterminated – when we humans allowed Nature to go back to “normal” and stopped trying to change things.

How Wolves Change Rivers – For The Better!

 

 

 

 

 

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Why We Won't Miss Elephants Once They Are Gone by Mark Deeble

baby elephant trunk up B&W

Mark Deeble has been making films in East Africa with his partner, Vicky, for 24 years (www.deeblestone.com). Now, they’re making a film about elephants and by the time it is finished, they’ll have devoted five years to it. In that same time about a quarter of a million elephants will have been killed in Africa, by poachers.

Not surprisingly, they think about elephants a lot, interact with them on an almost daily basis and would find it hard to imagine a world without them. They’ve been there since 1987 and it’s inconceivable for them to think of Tsavo without elephants. Today there are 11,000 elephants in the Greater Tsavo Ecosystem.

Mark said: “We all have different points from which we measure change through time. Call it a ‘benchmark’, ‘baseline’ or ‘point of comparison’ – that point of comparison is normally defined by our age or experience.”

It dawned on Mark that we don’t miss what we’ve never known. For the first time he looked around with eyes wide open, and wondered what might have gone before.

low angle eles at water

“In conservation, ‘benchmarks’ are crucial – without benchmark surveys, we just don’t know what we are losing and the rate that it is disappearing. Too often we roll our eyes at the phrase, ‘It was better in my day’ – but, when it comes to habitats and wildlife, with very few exceptions, it was. As a result, we lose both wildlife and habitat and we barely notice that it is happening.”

For Mark and Vicky, as new arrivals in East Africa, their ‘benchmark’ was dated September 1987.

When they arrived on the continent, rhinos had already been almost poached out of existence.

Because they had never known them, they didn’t miss them.

The tragedy now, is that it is happening with elephants.

They would be devastated if, like the rhino, elephants fade into ecological extinction. If their decline continues to accelerate as it is, it is quite probable that the next generation won’t know them as they do.

That is why Mark thinks that in the future, we won’t miss them – as we simply won’t have had the chance to get to know them as we do today.

“It makes it all the more important to put a stop to the ivory trade now – while we still know elephants and can experience them – not just intellectually, but emotionally.”

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LET US UNITE FOR WILDLIFE

It is our responsibility to do something about this for our world, for our planet, for future generations, for these non-humans who cannot do it for themselves.We must not sit back and do nothing. Things will not change on their own if we don’t change things ourselves. Please make yourself aware of what is going on in your world.

Do not shut your eyes.

Do not close your ears.

Listen.

And do.

Prince Charles and William ‘Unite for Wildlife

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IF YOU HAVE EVER DOUBTED YOURSELF

STRAIGHT FROM THE HUFFINGTON POST:

This is appropriate for everyone though it captured my attention because I’m a writer. Though it is pointed toward creative types, I encourage anyone and everyone to watch this short 2-minute video because it applies to life in general.

The best 2 minutes I’ve used in a long time.

In Just 2 Minutes, This Video Will Make You Feel Silly For Ever Having Doubted Yourself

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